Tag Archives: Books

On David Yates, The Order of the Phoneix and Two More Sleeps Until Deathly Hallows

I am (obviously) a huge Harry Potter fan They are some of my favourite books of all time, and they reside on my “shelf of honour”, the books that must be re-read each year. I am sure just as many other fans had the same trepidation I had when they first announced the movies.

Buckbeak VS The Happy Hippogriff

I was sorting through my many spares of Harry Potter books the other day (the shelves on my ‘good’ bookcase are starting to bow) as I had just purchased some to sell. I had some US editions in hardcover. While I don’t mind the US editions I was never a huge fan of the artwork. I also hate the fact they changed the text in them, but that’s another rant.

I have two American collectors editions, which are fantastic, leather, super-bound, gorgeous pictures including an insert facsimile of an orginal J.K Rowling drawing of the Harry Potter  gang. Those, of course, stay. Also, why didn’t they print them all? Seriously. The British deluxe editions pale in comparison.

Sweet Valley Confidential – For the Love of Nostalgia Please Stop

So they’re releasing “Sweet Valley Confidential”, and they’re making a Sweet Valley High movie too.

There is a reason Sweet Valley High books were so popular in the 1980’s. And 1990’s. And early 2000’s for that matter. I’m not going to count how many were written but it is some mind-boggling number like over 500 at a quick glance. This includes the spin-offs, University, Senior High, Twins, Unicorn Club, Kids, Junior High, Thrillers for each spin-off series etc.

Don’t Be Afraid to Read Bentley Little…

My friend Dave is visiting from Western Australia. You will probably hear a bit about Dave in future blogs. Usually referred to as “Dave” or sometimes “Comic Book Dave” depending on what I am discussing. Dave is a passionate book collector, and we have many long discussions about books and our latest finds. Obviously he collects comics, but he also collects a massive amount of fiction, hardback first editions, of course.

Clair-de-Lune by Cassandra Golds – The Mouse, The Monk and the Moonlight Ballerina

Clair de Lune by Cassandra Golds

“Once upon a time – one hundred years ago, and half as many years again – there lived a girl called Clair-de-Lune, who could not speak”

So we meet our heroine, Clair-de-Lune, who lives at the top of a very tall, very narrow, very old building with her Grandmother, Madame Nuit. Clair-de-Lune has not spoken a word since the night her mother, the great ballerina La Lune, died onstage…

“at the end of a tragic and beautiful ballet about swans, who, it is said, are mute until the very last moments of their lives, when they give forth the most lovely of all songs”

On ‘Recycling’ Vintage Books and What It’s Worth

‘Cassandra by Chance’ by Betty Neels original cover from 1973,  opposite a 1990’s reprint of the same book.

While you’ll often find art-work reproduced from vintage pulp-fiction, the early Mills and Boon and Harlequin artwork tends to get overlooked. Some of those old covers feature the coolest artwork, and I am sorry they don’t reproduce it when they reprint collector’s editions of books. Once in a (very long) while I come across large collections of M&B from the 60’s and 70’s, and if I am lucky I might find some of the 1950’s hardcovers (I have featured a picture of one in a previous blog on Betty Neels) which are really a lot of fun to go through.

On Comfort Zones, Happy Like Murderers and Loving Your Customers

I loathe listing true crime. When I sit with a pile of books filled with murder, torture, rape, and other unspeakable things, and as I read the back of the book for the synopsis, I get completely creeped out. It might sound ridiculous, but there you have it. I have hundreds of true crime books, and I usually limit myself to listing a small group at a time as it’s about all I can stand.

Book Review: The Red Queen by Philippa Gregory

Publisher: Simon and Schuster
Published: September 2010
Genre: Historical Fiction

The second book in Philippa’s stunning new trilogy, The Cousins War, brings to life the story of Margaret Beaufort, a shadowy and mysterious character in the first book of the series – The White Queen – but who now takes centre stage in the bitter struggle of The War of the Roses.
The Red Queen tells the story of the child-bride of Edmund Tudor, who, although widowed in her early teens, uses her determination of character and wily plotting to infiltrate the house of York under the guise of loyal friend and servant, undermine the support for Richard III and ultimately ensure that her only son, Henry Tudor, triumphs as King of England. Through collaboration with the dowager Queen Elizabeth Woodville, Margaret agrees a betrothal between Henry and Elizabeth’s daughter, thereby uniting the families and resolving the Cousins War once and for all by founding of the Tudor dynasty.

Harry Potter and the Finale – A Journey

I think most (if not all) devoted Harry Potter fans have suffered ‘Post-Potter-Depression’.

One you devoured your latest Potter in short order you were left with a feeling of  loss. There was, after all, yet another year (or three) to go until your next adventure. Then there was the pre-release hype, the endless online discussions and speculation, the anticipation of once again diving into the world of Hogwarts and seeing your heroes triumph against adversity.